Native american ethnobotany database. Calocedrus decurrens (Torr.) Florin. Incense Cedar...

culled from a large listing of native American medical ethnobotany (Mo

A Database of Foods, Drugs, Dyes and Fibers of Native American Peoples, Derived from Plants. International Ethnobotany Database The International Ethnobotany Database (ebDB) is a new, public database that fills in the existing gaps in functionality, and provides a standardized, secure, independent, and non-commercial repository for ...Sahnish (Arikara) Ethnobotany. Figure 1: A traditional Arikara burden basket with burden strap/tumpline made by SteštAhkáta of box elder (the white splints) and red-brown splints, which are made of the dried inner bark of peach leaf willow ( Salix amygdaloides ), to make the artistic pattern. These baskets were used for carrying ears of corn ...Ethnobotany. Many Pacific Northwest tribes (including the Chehalis, Clallam, Hesquiat, Nlaka'pamux, and others) have used the bulbs as a food source (smashed, boiled, roasted, steamed, baked, dried). The camas root is one of the most important foods to western North American native people.Native American Ethnobotany. Hardcover – August 15, 1998. An extraordinary compilation of the plants used by North American native peoples for medicine, food, fiber, dye, and a host of other things. Anthropologist Daniel E. Moerman has devoted 25 years to the task of gathering together the accumulated ethnobotanical knowledge on more than ...Apache, Chiricahua & Mescalero Food, Sauce & Relish. Seeds ground into flour and used to make a thick gravy. Castetter, Edward F. and M. E. Opler, 1936, Ethnobiological Studies in the American Southwest III. The Ethnobiology of the Chiricahua and Mescalero Apache, University of New Mexico Bulletin 4 (5):1-63, page 48.Welcome. Welcome to the Native Medicinal Plant Research Program at the University of Kansas. Our program focuses on native plants and ethnobotany of the Midwest, Great Plains, and Mountain West. Our program began in 2009 as a broad-based search for medicinal compounds of plants in our region. Over 200 hundred plants were collected in the field ...Introductions to various aspects of TCM theory and practice are presented, along with monographs of 116 herbs. 5. The traditional Indian medicines databases ...Navajo Food, Unspecified detail... (Castetter, Edward F., 1935, Ethnobiological Studies in the American Southwest I. Uncultivated Native Plants Used as Sources of Food, University of New Mexico Bulletin 4 (1):1-44, pages 37) Navajo Other, Designs detail... (Elmore, Francis H., 1944, Ethnobotany of the Navajo, Sante Fe, NM.The database of ethnobotanical uses can now be searched using two different methods. A traditional text search provides basic text searching with experimental Boolean search features. A 'filtered' search allows you to select multiple attributes of the data to filter the search results. View Resource. Related Topics.Using the online Native American Ethnobotany (NAEB) database, this study compiled a list of Asteraceae species and their ethnobotanical uses to identify tribes, genera, or species that are over-utilized as medicinal aids. It was hypothesized that the selection of North American Asteraceae species, based on reported uses by Indigenous peoples ...Turner, Nancy Chapman and Marcus A. M. Bell, 1971, The Ethnobotany of the Coast Salish Indians of Vancouver Island, I and II, Economic Botany 25 (1):63-104, 335-339, page 82. Arbutus menziesii Pursh. Pacific Madrone. USDA ARME. Cowichan Other, Preservative. Bark boiled and used for tanning paddles and fishhooks.Daniel E. Moerman Timber Press, 1998 - Science - 927 pages Native American Ethnobotany is a comprehensive account of the plants used by Native American peoples for medicine, food, and other...Native American Ethnobotany: A Database of Foods, Drugs, Dyes and Fibers of Native American Peoples, Derived from Plants. Facebook Twitter LinkedIn Email ... The database of ethnobotanical uses can now be searched using two different methods. A traditional text search provides basic text searching with experimental Boolean search features.Since 1990, November has been known as Native American Heritage Month in the United States. The commemorative month aims to highlight the contributions of Indigenous people; share their perspectives; and reiterate the importance of reflecti...Ethnobotany. Food Uses: Bella Coola have mixed the berries with melted mountain goat fat and served to chiefs at feasts. Blackfoot and Chinook have eaten the berries fresh, dried, or mashed and fried in fat. ... BRIT - native American ethnobotany database. Brit.org. [accessed 2021 …(Vestal, Paul A., 1952, The Ethnobotany of the Ramah Navaho, Papers of the Peabody Museum of American Archaeology and Ethnology 40(4):1-94, pages 14) Nimpkish Fiber, Clothing detail... (Turner, Nancy Chapman and Marcus A. M. Bell, 1973, The Ethnobotany of the Southern Kwakiutl Indians of British Columbia, Economic Botany 27:257-310, pages 296)Native American ethnobotany. This is a list of plants used by the indigenous people of North America. For lists pertaining specifically to the Cherokee, Iroquois, Navajo, and Zuni, see Cherokee ethnobotany, Iroquois ethnobotany, Navajo ethnobotany, and Zuni ethnobotany . This list is incomplete; you can help by adding missing items.Native American Ethnobotany Working with Native American tribes, we are collecting, recording, and sharing information on their current and historical plant. Learn more from …Native American Ethnobotany - A database of foods, drugs, dyes and fibers of Native American peoples, derived from plants. eHRAF Archaeology - A cross-cultural database containing information on the world's prehistory designed to …(Smith, Huron H., 1928, Ethnobotany of the Meskwaki Indians, Bulletin of the Public Museum of the City of Milwaukee 4:175-326, pages 216) Meskwaki Drug, Urinary Aid detail... (Smith, Huron H., 1928, Ethnobotany of the Meskwaki Indians, Bulletin of the Public Museum of the City of Milwaukee 4:175-326, pages 216) Meskwaki Drug, Venereal Aid detail...It’s also the symbol of our Native Medicinal Plant Research Program, found on our logo and in our printed materials. From 2007 to 2008, echinacea sales went up 4.5 percent to $15.1 million. Echinacea was estimated by the National Health Interview Survey to be the third most common natural product in 2007, used by 4.8 million adults.Here's a link to the Native American Ethnobotany database. It's a little tricky to use but it has a ton of information. Plug in the name of the plant you are looking for and you'll get a ton of Native American uses. If you click on the link in the name it will take you to the USDA plant database for a picture of the plant. Pretty cool.Founded in 1961, the Journal of American Indian Education (JAIE) is a journal featuring original scholarship on education issues of American Indians, Alaska Natives, Native Hawaiians, and Indigenous peoples worldwide, including First Nations, Māori, Aboriginal/Torres Strait Islander peoples, and Indigenous peoples of Latin America, Africa, and ...Oct 31, 2022 ... comprehensive ethnobotanical database due to prevent the traditional knowledge of ethnobotany ... [17] Native American Ethnobotany DB. Retrieved ...Vestal, Paul A., 1952, The Ethnobotany of the Ramah Navaho, Papers of the Peabody Museum of American Archaeology and Ethnology 40(4):1-94, page 15, 16 Bouteloua gracilis (Willd. ex Kunth) Lag. ex Griffiths Blue Grama USDA BOGR2: Navajo, Ramah Drug, Gynecological Aid Decoction of whole plant taken as a postpartum medicine.Hart, Jeff, 1992, Montana Native Plants and Early Peoples, Helena. Montana Historical Society Press, page 22 Larix occidentalis Nutt. Western Larch USDA LAOC: Flathead Food, Unspecified Cambium layer eaten in spring. Hart, Jeff, 1992, Montana Native Plants and Early Peoples, Helena. Montana Historical Society Press, page 22Ethnobotany is the study of how people of a particular culture and region make use of indigenous (native) plants. Plants provide food, medicine, shelter, dyes, fibers, oils, resins, gums, soaps, waxes, latex, tannins, and even contribute to the air we breathe. Many native peoples also use plants in ceremonial or spiritual rituals.Vestal, Paul A., 1952, The Ethnobotany of the Ramah Navaho, Papers of the Peabody Museum of American Archaeology and Ethnology 40(4):1-94, page 54 Verbesina encelioides ssp. exauriculata (Robins. & Greenm.) J.R. Coleman Golden Crownbeard USDA VEENE2: Navajo, Ramah Other, Ceremonial Items Used to make antelope prayer stick in Plumeway.NC Native Ethnobotany Project. Building Healthier Communities Through Healthier Living. NC Native Ethnobotany Project. The North Carolina Native American ...Typha latifolia L. Common names: Broadleaf Cattail Species details (USDA): USDA TYLA Documented uses 254 uses documented Acoma Food, Unspecified detail... (Castetter, Edward F., 1935, Ethnobiological Studies in the American Southwest I. Uncultivated Native Plants Used as Sources of Food, University of New Mexico Bulletin 4(1):1-44, pages 53)Bocek, Barbara R., 1984, Ethnobotany of Costanoan Indians, California, Based on Collections by John P. Harrington, Economic Botany 38(2):240-255, page 250 Fraxinus latifolia Benth. Oregon Ash USDA FRLA: Cowlitz Drug, Anthelmintic Infusion of bark taken for worms. Gunther, Erna, 1973, Ethnobotany of Western Washington, Seattle.The medicinal knowledge of native North American peoples is extraordinary. Just how this knowledge was developed remains a mystery. Native American peoples came from Asia; the flora of Asia is in many ways similar to that of North America (Duke and Ayensu 1985). It is quite likely that the first migrants to the New World brought with them ...Oshá, bear root or chuchupate, was used by Native Americans to treat a variety of ailments, particularly those relating to the lungs and heart. Oshá is a slow-growing member of the parsley family (Apiaceae). Its roots are currently wild-harvested by individuals and herbal product companies for sale and use in treating influenza, bronchitis ...Smith, Huron H., 1923, Ethnobotany of the Menomini Indians, Bulletin of the Public Museum of the City of Milwaukee 4:1-174, page 26 Corylus americana Walt. American HazelnutDocumented uses. 72 uses documented. Abnaki Food, Fruit detail... (Rousseau, Jacques, 1947, Ethnobotanique Abenakise, Archives de Folklore 11:145-182, pages 169) Alaska Native Food, Fruit detail... (Heller, Christine A., 1953, Edible and Poisonous Plants of Alaska, University of Alaska, pages 93) Alaska Native Food, Preserves detail...Douglas Fir. USDA PSMEM. Keresan Other, Ceremonial Items. Used to make costumes for dancers, prayer sticks and other ceremonial items. White, Leslie A, 1945, Notes on the Ethnobotany of the Keres, Papers of the Michigan Academy of Arts, Sciences and Letters 30:557-568, page 563. Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirbel) Franco.Daniel E. Moerman Native American Ethnobotany Hardcover - August 15, 1998 by Daniel E. Moerman (Author) 4.7 314 ratings See all formats and editionsTurner, Nancy Chapman and Marcus A. M. Bell, 1971, The Ethnobotany of the Coast Salish Indians of Vancouver Island, I and II, Economic Botany 25(1):63-104, 335-339, page 69 View all documented uses for Polypodium virginianum L. ... Native …The Native American Ethnobotany database, compiled by Daniel Moerman, is a comprehensive digest of uses (medicinal as well as food, dyes, fibres) of …Brit - native american ethnobotany database https://agsci.oregonstate.edu/mes/sustainable/wildflowers/medicinal-uses/ethnobotany-native-american-cultures ...Calocedrus decurrens (Torr.) Florin. Incense Cedar. USDA CADE27. Cahuilla Fiber, Building Material. Bark used to make conical shaped houses for temporary use while camped to gather and process acorns. Bean, Lowell John and Katherine Siva Saubel, 1972, Temalpakh (From the Earth); Cahuilla Indian Knowledge and Usage of Plants, Banning, CA.Toxicodendron diversilobum (Torr. & Gray) Greene Common names: Pacific Poison Oak Species details (USDA): USDA TODI Documented uses 25 uses documented Costanoan Fiber, Basketry detail... (Bocek, Barbara R., 1984, Ethnobotany of Costanoan Indians, California, Based on Collections by John P. Harrington, Economic Botany 38(2):240-255, pages 251)Native American Authors A list provided by the IPL2 (formerly the Internet Public Library). Includes bibliographies of published works, biographical information, and links to online resources including interviews, online texts and tribal web sites. Native American Ethnobotany Database The Pluralism Project: Native American TraditionsCastetter, Edward F. and Ruth M. Underhill, 1935, Ethnobiological Studies in the American Southwest II. The Ethnobiology of the Papago Indians, University of New Mexico Bulletin 4(3):1-84, page 14 Ferocactus wislizeni (Engelm.) Britt. & Rose Candy Barrelcactus USDA FEWI: Pima Food, Beverage Juice extracted from pulp and used to quench thirst.Plants and herbs for Native American traditional teas, food, medicines; ethnobotany databases. Field ID photos with native info, vocabulary. Books and teacher resources. ... American Indian Ethnobotany Database--At the University of Michigan. Almost 4,000 plantnames, uses for food, medicine (the emphasis), fiber, and utility. Botannical names ...Ethnobotany. Food Uses: Bella Coola have mixed the berries with melted mountain goat fat and served to chiefs at feasts. Blackfoot and Chinook have eaten the berries fresh, dried, or mashed and fried in fat. ... BRIT - native American ethnobotany database. Brit.org. [accessed 2021 …Combining Ethnobotany and Informatics to Discover Knowledge from Data. Publisher: Science Publishers, New Hampshire, USA. Editors: Rai M, Acharya D, Rios JL.Native American Ethnobotany (University of Michigan - Dearborn) (LALA) Native Plants Network (LALA) ... VASCAN, the Database of Vascular Plants of Canada. Herbier Marie-Victorin, Institut de recherche en biologie végétale, Université de Montréal. Alberta, British Columbia, Labrador, Manitoba, New Brunswick, Newfoundland, Northwest ...Alaska Native Food, Fruit. Berries used for food. Heller, Christine A., 1953, Edible and Poisonous Plants of Alaska, University of Alaska, page 97. Rubus parviflorus Nutt. Thimbleberry. USDA RUPAP2. Bella Coola Food, Preserves. Berries cooked with wild raspberries and other fruits into a thick jam, dried and used for food.Hart, Jeff, 1992, Montana Native Plants and Early Peoples, Helena. Montana Historical Society Press, page 22 Larix occidentalis Nutt. Western Larch USDA LAOC: Flathead Food, Unspecified Cambium layer eaten in spring. Hart, Jeff, 1992, Montana Native Plants and Early Peoples, Helena. Montana Historical Society Press, page 22Decoction of plant used as lotion for skin cuts on horses. Vestal, Paul A., 1952, The Ethnobotany of the Ramah Navaho, Papers of the Peabody Museum of American Archaeology and Ethnology 40 (4):1-94, page 23. Eriogonum alatum Torr. Winged Buckwheat. USDA ERALA2. Navajo Drug, Analgesic. Plant used for pain.Native American Ethnobotany Database. A Database of Foods, Drugs, Dyes and Fibers of Native American Peoples, Derived from Plants. Tropical Plant Database. Created by Dr. Leslie Taylor this website provides free access to well-researched and referenced monographs on healing plants from the rain forest and nearby areas. Although the site offers ...Contacts. For general questions or comments about the data and site, please contact: Dan Moerman. 2134 CASL Annex. 4901 Evergreen Rd. Dearborn MI 48198. dmoerman (at) umich.edu. For technical issues about the site, please contact: Jason Best.In addition, we are building an extensive Prairie Ethnobotany Database by researching, compiling, and synthesizing data from existing ethnobotanical information on Native Medicinal Plants of Kansas, the Great Plains and adjacent areas. The database now contains nearly 1,500 species, about two-thirds of which occur in Kansas.Turner, Nancy J., 1973, The Ethnobotany of the Bella Coola Indians of British Columbia, Syesis 6:193-220, page 204. Arctostaphylos uva-ursi (L.) Spreng. Kinnikinnick. USDA ARUV. Blackfoot Drug, Dermatological Aid. Infusion of plant, mixed with grease & boiled hoof, applied as a salve to itching and peeling scalp.View all documented uses for Bahia dissecta (Gray) Britt. Scientific name: Bahia dissecta (Gray) Britt. USDA symbol: BADI ( View details at USDA PLANTS site) Common names: Ragleaf Bahia. Family: Asteraceae. Family (APG): Asteraceae. Native American Tribe: Keres, Western. Use category: Drug. Use sub-category: Emetic.Documented uses. 102 uses documented. Cherokee Drug, Anthelmintic detail... (Hamel, Paul B. and Mary U. Chiltoskey, 1975, Cherokee Plants and Their Uses -- A 400 Year History, Sylva, N.C. Herald Publishing Co., pages 54) Cherokee Drug, Anthelmintic detail... (Taylor, Linda Averill, 1940, Plants Used As Curatives by Certain Southeastern Tribes ...USDA Plants Database · NatureServe · Native American Ethnobotany (part of the University of Michigan - Dearborn) Michigan Natural Features Inventory. The ...G AGIS Medical Plants Native American DataBase (MPNADB)--Similar to the U. Michigan database, but with the money and resources of government agencies behind it, the database is a more powerful searcher on the 3700 plants it contains. ... Turner, BTW is an anthro who thinks kinikinnik and tobacco are Native American Ethnobotany, Plant Knowledge ...This estimate is derived from two data sources: the Native American Ethnobotany database (Native American Ethnobotany 2019) and the Medicinal and Aromatic Plants of the World (MAPROW) database (Schippmann 2019). The Native American Ethnobotany database, compiled by Daniel Moerman, is a comprehensive digest of uses …. In Native American Medicinal Plants, anthrThis plant grows on both sides of the Cas Database information is seldom provided in reference list entries. The reference provides readers with the details they will need to perform a search themselves if they want to read the work—in most cases, writers do not need to explain the path they personally used. Think of it this way: When you buy a book at a bookstore or order a copy off ...Toggle navigation Native American Ethnobotany DB. Home; Search Uses; Tribes; Species; About; Contact; Tribe: Apache Documented uses 54 uses documented Agastache pallidiflora ssp. neomexicana var. neomexicana (Briq.) Bocek, Barbara R., 1984, Ethnobotany of Costanoan Indians, Califor Turner, Nancy J., 1973, The Ethnobotany of the Bella Coola Indians of British Columbia, Syesis 6:193-220, page 197. Abies amabilis (Dougl. ex Loud.) Dougl. ex Forbes. Pacific Silver Fir. USDA ABAM. Bella Coola Drug, Throat Aid. Liquid pitch mixed with mountain goat tallow and taken for sore throat. Turner, Nancy J., 1973, The Ethnobotany of the ... North Dakota Ethnobotany Database. Compiled from liter...

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